Morning Dad

Last night I felt my boy kick me through Kirsty’s belly.  He’s not quite ready to say “Morning Dad” yet but in a few short weeks he’ll arrive and we’ll both get to meet him for the first time and find out if his lungs are as powerful as his foot.

Seven months of pregnancy have rushed by like an avalanche of thoughts, fears and plans.  At 37 I’m a little older than the average new dad but I feel ready for this major step, something I certainly wouldn’t have said a couple of years back.  My thought processes have been fairly steadfast.  A week of “oh my god” in the beginning and a few “are we actually doing this?” moments since have been bubble wrapped in the excitement and trepidation that has taken over our every day life.  Our first day in Mothercare looking for a buggy was a crash course experience where everyone seemed to know what to do and which overly priced cart we should buy while we listened and learned like eager beavers.  After a few months of speaking to various professional parents (and hope-to-be’s and never-want-to-be’s) I see now how the grand baby plan works.

There isn’t one.  Every baby is different and everyone has an opinion and the only way we’ll know what to do is to try absolutely everything and find out what works for our little atom ball from day one.  We were in Alton Towers last year and I can see that our due date will be a little bit like being on the Oblivion ride.  Right now we’re riding away from the entrance, all excited and nervy, building up to the big overhang (which I did with my eyes closed I seem to recall…..). Once that little boy is here, we are dropped at high speed into a whole new world of challenge and frustration, love and devotion.

As I said, I rode Oblivion with my eyes shut.  In spite of the hugeness of what we are about to face, my eyes are and will be well and truly open.  Because I genuinely can’t wait to say “good morning” to my new born son for the first time.

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The Skye Cuillin

In July 2015 , we went on our second big walk of the year.  It was definitely big, although more of a scramble than a walk.

The Cuillin is the closest we have in Britain to the Alps and it’s a challenge in every way.  To walk in the Cuillin is to walk, scramble, climb, abseil and test your ability to deal with the toughest exposure imaginable.

We spent four days in the Cuillin exploring mountains and corries and it was probably the finest walking/mountain trip I’ve ever been on.  With the considerable assistance of Rich Parker, a mountain guide with Skye Guides, we experienced and achieved so much more than any of us could have imagined.

From Sgurr nan Gillean to the Inaccessible Pinnacle of Sgurr Dearg, we saw so much of what Skye and the Cuillin has to offer.  On the last day we were also first on scene of a fall from the In Pinn which reminded us just how dangerous these mountains can be.

Despite this the trip was truly awe-inspiring.  And this film hopefully gives you some idea just how amazing it was.

A Foggy Day on Goat Fell

May 2015 – After failing in our first attempt to get to Arran this year (gales, storms, power cuts in Ardrossan, ferry being used to take old soldiers to a mid-sea wreck etc.) we tried again.

The weather was better and the mountain was inviting.  And despite threatening to drown us in rain and fog, the views were pretty awesome.

Ledi Me Tell You About The Rob Roy Way

The first of this years big hikes in April 2015, we set out to complete a section of the Rob Roy Way from Aberfoyle to Killin over three days.

And since we were feeling fit, on day two we also took on Ben Ledi, which is a Corbett nestling on the edge of Callander.  We’re tough like that.